The Office of International Student Services (ISS) is located in 143 Tomlinson and open all year, Monday through Friday, except for university holidays.

ISS staff is available to students in-person and by phone only during Walk-In Hours.

  • Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, & Friday- 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Wednesday- 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

If you need to make an appointment, please either call the office, stop by in person, or email international@case.edu

For more information about Walk-in Hours visit the Information for Students quicklink.

ISS Events

Newsletter Archive

Browse our newsletter archives for news, events and announcements you may have missed!

Promoting Intercultural Exchange at Case

The mission of the Office of International Student Services (ISS) is to enhance the international student experience and promote intercultural exchange at CWRU.

We can assist you with:

  • Immigration matters
  • Intercultural exchange opportunities
  • Leadership resources and programs
  • Understanding the social and academic culture at CWRU and in the US.

Read more about ISS and the services we provide.

[RSS] News + Announcements

OPT workshops
Optional Practical Training (OPT) Workshops Scheduled

If you are graduating by Summer 2015 and intend to apply for Optional Practical Training (OPT), ISS would like to remind you about our policies and procedures regarding OPT.

ISS believes that it's essential for all students to be well-informed about the application process and their responsibilities while authorized for OPT, which is why every student must complete a workshop. ISS has OPT workshops scheduled beginning April 21 through May 20, 2015. The workshops will be held in Tomlinson 139 (the smaller of the two conference rooms) and limited to 8 students. Registration to attend a workshop is required and must be completed through OrgSync. If you see a blank calendar, that means that you need to log in (using your CWRU network ID and password). Once logged in, click on My Memberships and select International Student Services. All international students should already have ISS listed there, but if you don't, do a search and ISS will pop right up. Click on Events to see all OPT Workshops and finally click on the session for which you wish to register.

All workshops are scheduled for 90 minutes. Please plan on arriving early and staying for the entire 90 minutes. If you do not stay for the entire workshop or arrive more than 5 minutes late, you're not considered to have attended.

For any student graduating by Summer 2015 who is unable to attend one of the in-person OPT workshops offered, there will be a final opportunity to complete the required training session through an online training presentation. The OPT Online Training will be available at the end of June for a short period of time. More information about the OPT Online Training will be provided later in the summer. Please note that waiting until the end of June to prepare your OPT might not provide enough time for government processing; every effort to attend a workshop in-person should be made.

Only students graduating by Summer 2015 should be accessing this module. If you complete this module now, but do not apply for OPT until Fall 2015 or later, you will be required to attend a workshop or complete the module at that later, more appropriate time.

Please keep in mind that ISS will only accept complete applications from students who have attended a workshop (either in-person or online). Be sure to read all of the information carefully and prepare everything that's required for processing.

Future workshops will be scheduled for Fall graduates and advertised through the website, ISSNews, and From the Director's Desk.

Final Reminder: Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct

All degree-seeking students will receive a final reminder this week from Vice President Lou Stark encouraging them to respond to the Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct. The survey will close on April 23. Results will be used to improve programs and services currently being offered. Participation is voluntary, and responses will not be connected to individual students. Questions about the survey can be directed to CWRU's Office of Institutional Research at ofir@case.edu. Questions regarding your rights as a research participant should be directed to the CWRU Institutional Review Board at 216.368.6925 or cwru-irb@case.edu.

Grads: Graduate Student Council Executive Committee Elections

Dear Student Leaders,

I am writing you in my capacity as Chair of the CWRU Intergovernmental Task Force on Unification, the interdisciplinary and interschool cohort of graduate students who explored the logistics of unifying the two preeminent representative graduate student governments at CWRU. As you have heard, on March 27, the Graduate Student Senate (GSS) and Graduate Professional Council (GPC) voted to unify and become the Graduate Student Council (GSC). The Constitution and Bylaws of this new governing body are attached. Going forward, this government will represent ALL graduate students at CWRU, holding audience with key university leaders including the CWRU Board of Trustees, President, Provost, Deans, and key Vice Presidents. On June 1, the government's executive committee will take office.

We seek your assistance in recruiting and sending representatives to the Council to participate in elections for the GSC Executive Committee. These representatives will vote for Council Leadership at a special meeting on April 30 at 5:30 p.m. in the Toepfer Room, 2nd Floor, Adelbert Hall. Each school has been awarded a cohort of representatives based on graduate student population. Details can be found here: https://sites.google.com/a/case.edu/gsc/reps. Ideally, representatives will be students from the divisions as outlined on this website. For example, Weatherhead (WSOM) suggested it would allocate its 6 representatives as follows: 1 MBA (FT or PT); 1 MSM (Finance or Operations); 1 PHD/Research based; 1 MAcc/Practical based; 2 at-large.

We seek only temporary representatives, acknowledging that each school will elect representatives annually in the way they best see fit. So, these representatives do not need to be the official representatives for the next year, but it would be great if we could identify these representatives by April 23, so they can be given information ahead of the vote on April 30. We will provide an option for proxy voting if a representative cannot come to the meeting on April 30, but we strongly encourage representatives to attend in-person if possible. Please look at the website for your representative allocations and identify representatives.

Please send a list of the representatives for your school to gsc-elections@case.edu no later than April 23. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me at gss-gpc@case.edu. Thanks so much for all your help!

Neetu M. Gulati

GSS-GPC Liaison

Intergovernmental Taskforce on Unification Chair

PhD Candidate, Department of Pharmacology

Case Western Reserve University

h1b
USCIS reaches H-1B Cap

USCIS announced that it had completed the H-1B lottery selection and that it had received approximately 233,000 petitions for fiscal year 2016 beginning in October 2015. Last year, USCIS received 172,500 petitions. The numbers this year mean that there was an increase of over 35% from last year. USCIS randomly selected petitions to meet the general category cap of 65,000 and the advance degree exemption of 20,000.

USCIS will begin premium processing selected cases no later than May 11. Unselected cases will be rejected and returned. Petitioners will have to wait for a few more weeks to find out if their petitions were accepted or rejected by the lottery. The majority of petitions will be rejected and petitioners may need to start thinking about and considering alternatives to the H-1B such as continued work on OPT, L-1, O-1 or other potential non-immigrant categories as may be appropriate for the relevant employee.

engineer
Engineering Education Internship

Thanks to the generous support of the Leonard Gelfand STEM Center, the Center for Civic Engagement & Learning will be recruiting six undergraduate students to serve in full-time, paid summer internships through the 2015 Engineering Education Summer Outreach program. This nine week summer program (June 1 to July 31, 2015) will expand access to engineering education by matching CWRU undergraduate students with summer youth programs in the Greater Cleveland community. CWRU student interns will design and implement engineering classes with youth enrolled in the programs. Interns will also have the opportunity to build their civic awareness and leadership skills through regular seminars. Visit the Engineering Education Summer Outreach program website for more information about the program and application process for CWRU students. Online applications must be submitted by Sunday, April 19.

gsc
Graduate Student Council - Elections

On March 27, the Graduate Student Senate (GSS) and Graduate Professional Council (GPC) voted to unify and become the Graduate Student Council (GSC). Going forward, this government will represent ALL graduate students at CWRU, holding audience with key university leaders including the CWRU Board of Trustees, President, Provost, Deans, and key Vice Presidents. On June 1, the government's executive committee will take office.

GSC seeks your assistance in recruiting and sending representatives to the Council to participate in elections for the GSC Executive Committee. These representatives will vote for Council Leadership at a special meeting on April 30 at 5:30 p.m. in the Toepfer Room, 2nd Floor, Adelbert Hall. Each school has been awarded a cohort of representatives based on graduate student population. Details can be found here: https://sites.google.com/a/case.edu/gsc/reps. Ideally, representatives will be students from the divisions as outlined on this website. Representative allocations are at the bottom.

Only temporary representatives are sought, acknowledging that each school will elect representatives annually in the way they best see fit. So, these representatives do not need to be the official representatives for the next year, butthey need to be identified by April 23, so they can be given information ahead of the vote on April 30. Proxy voting if a representative cannot come to the meeting on April 30 is an option. Please look at the website for your representative allocations and identify representatives.

Please send a list of the representatives for your school to gsc-elections@case.edu no later than April 23. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me at gss-gpc@case.edu. Thanks so much for all your help!

Case School of Engineering: 6 representatives
1 representative each per engineering department
College of Arts and Sciences: 6 representatives
3 representatives from "Arts"
3 representatives from "Sciences"
Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences: 5 representatives
elected by school-wide government
School of Dental Medicine: 5 representatives
elected by school-wide government
School of Law: 5 representatives
elected by school-wide government
School of Medicine: 8 representatives
2/3 MD
2 PhD
2/3 Masters (MS/MPH)
1 MSTP
School of Nursing: 6 representatives
1 MN
2 MSN
1 DNP
2 PhD
Weatherhead School of Management: 6 representatives
1 MBA (FT or PT)
1 MSM (Finance or Operations)
1 PHD/Research based
1 MAcc/Practical based
2 At-large

history
HSTY 110- Introduction to U.S. History for International Students

This course (taught by Professor David Hammack with assistance from T.A. Mrs. Yuan Liu on Monday & Wednesday, 12:30-1:45 p.m.) offers an introduction to U.S. history for international and other students, especially students who did not study U.S. history in secondary school. The course emphasizes changes that over the past 400 years have shaped the diversity of the people, the development of the economy, the government and politics, and the international position of the U.S. as they exist today. The course puts particular emphasis on American business firms, professional associations, and nongovernment/nonprofit organizations.

The course takes into account that for most international students English is a second language. This is reflected in the materials assigned for study, in the writing assignments, and in the way we will run the class sessions. During the semester, we will consider student suggestions for changes.

The course will begin with some practical attention to the way U.S. history can help explain laws and customs relating to automobiles; to renting or buying an apartment or a house; to the use and consumption of alcohol and of various drugs; to marriage, divorce, and child placement. We will also consider government and private agency roles in licensing professionals, accrediting universities and hospitals, and regulating business and finance.

All topics considered in the course attract deep and continuous debate. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the best current knowledge, and the most influential debates.

Study materials include a substantial share of visual and graphic material (including charts and graphs), as well as carefully selected readings in English. Much of the study material is available online on the web. Included are many historical and analytic maps, as well as photographs, posters, works of art, eyewitness documents, and YouTube videos and clips from documentary and feature films. Also included are some essential official documents and some carefully edited writings about key topics. Specific assignments explain what to look for in the study materials.

Writing is designed to help students improve their ability to write analytic essays in English. Students are asked to respond to specific, yet somewhat open-ended, questions about specific study materials each week. In place of exams, students are also asked to write three short papers two or three pages on the study materials and class discussions.

Class time will be devoted to discussion.Before each class, specific tasks will be assigned to each student, so far as possible according to each student's interests. Because this is a college-level history course – not a general language course – assigned tasks will aim to inspire quality discussion on important historical topics – What happened? Why? What are the important debates about what happened, why, and what events are still important? And how do we know? Our own experiences always influence us, but history seeks to move to the kinds of general understandings that informed, thoughtful people see as defensible.

acred
Opportunity to Meet with the University's Accreditors

Representatives of the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools arrive on campus Monday, April 13. They will hold two days of meetings to assess the university's performance relative to the five criteria essential for the university's accreditation. This process takes place every 10 years; the university has been accredited since 1967. Members of the Case Western Reserve community and the public may attend any of six open meetings scheduled over the course of the team's visit. For more information, visit http://thedaily.case.edu/news/?p=38457.

Monday, April 13
  • 3:15–4:15 p.m., Drop-in Session for Faculty (Senior Classroom, Room 134 Tinkham Veale University Center)
  • 3:15–4:15 p.m., Teaching and Learning – Quality, Resources, Support, Evaluations and Improvement (Toepfer Room, Adelbert Hall)
  • 4:15–5:15 p.m., Drop-in Session for Students (Senior Classroom, Room 134 Tinkham Veale University Center)
Tuesday, April 14
  • 9:15–10:15 a.m., Resources, Planning and Institutional Effectiveness (Toepfer Room, Adelbert Hall)
  • 10:15­­–11:15 a.m., Drop-in Session for Staff (Senior Classroom, Room 134 Tinkham Veale University Center)
  • 10:15­–11:15 a.m., Mission and Ethical/Responsible Conduct (Toepfer Room, Adelbert Hall)
selp
Graduate Student Spoken English Seminar: Academic Communication and Culture

The ESS Spoken English Seminar is a non-credit course for graduate and professional students who would like to enhance their spoken English skills. The registration deadline is Wednesday, July 1, 2015. The program will fill quickly, so register as soon as possible.

There is a fee for this program. This fee does not include housing or insurance.

For more information on this program and how to register, students should contact:

Judy Hammer, Director of Educational Services for Students, at selp@case.edu or by phone at 216.368.5230 Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m..

First Destination Survey - Seniors

The First Destination Survey was sent to seniors on Monday, April 14 by Thomas B. Matthews, PhD, Executive Director of the Career Center.

This is an IMPORTANT survey that gives prospective and current CWRU students, parents, faculty, and staff critical information about the post-graduation plans of graduating undergraduates. CWRU uses these results to learn about students' needs and develop ways to meet them.

Your individual responses are confidential and information will only be shared in the aggregate.

Traditionally international students have had a low rate of participation in this survey. CWRU wants to hear from you so it is especially important to share your plans! Please take a few minutes to fill out the survey prior to the end of spring classes!

Those who indicate on the survey that they are still looking for full-time employment will receive a follow-up over the summer. Please note that Career Center programs and services are available to alumni, as well as to current students. Those in need of career assistance are encouraged to schedule an appointment to meet with a career counselor.

International Student Services

143 Tomlinson Hall
216.368.2517
international@case.edu

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